CLICK HERE FOR BLOGGER TEMPLATES AND MYSPACE LAYOUTS »

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Turkey Stew






Yesterday I talked about a use for ground beef...Today I have a recipe for leftover turkey..I know I should have written this right after Thanksgiving...but I didn't know about this recipe at the time...Anyway..check this out-


Turkey Stew with Root Vegetables Recipe


Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 2 hours, 30 minutes


Save time by prepping the root vegetables during the first stage of the stew's oven cooking.


INGREDIENTS:

2 Tbsp olive oil

3 lbs turkey thighs (preferred) or legs (skin on, bone in)

1 medium-large yellow onion, peeled and roughly chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)

2 stalks celery, roughly chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)

2 teaspoons salt

1 quart chicken, turkey, or vegetable stock (use gluten-free stock if cooking gluten-free)

2 medium carrots, peeled, 1/4 inch slices (about 1 1 /4 cups)

2-3 medium turnips, peeled, 1/2 inch cubes

1 medium rutabaga, peeled, halved, cut into 1/4 inch thick slices

3 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and quartered

1 teaspoon herbes de provence

Freshly ground black pepper


DIRECTIONS:

1 Preheat oven to 300°F. Heat olive oil on medium high heat in a Dutch oven on the stove top. Wash and pat dry turkey pieces. Working in batches if necessary, brown turkey pieces, first skin side down, 2-3 minutes on each side. Sprinkle the thighs with a little salt as you brown them.

2 Once the thighs have browned, remove them from the pan and set them in a bowl. Add the onions and celery to the pot. Cook for about 5 minutes or so, until the onions are translucent and starting to brown at the edges.

3 Add 2 teaspoons of salt and half of the stock. Bring to a simmer, remove from the stove top and put in the oven, covered, for an hour and fifteen minutes.

4 After an hour and fifteen minutes, remove from oven and add the rest of the vegetables - carrots, turnips, rutabaga, and potatoes, the herbs, and the rest of the stock. Return to the oven, covered, and cook until tender, another 45 minutes or more.

5 Remove the turkey thighs from the stew and place in a bowl to cool. When cool enough to handle, strip the meat off the bones. Discard the bones and skin. Cut the meat into bite-sized pieces (1 1/2-inches or so chunks) and return to the pot.

Season the stew to taste.

Yield: Serves 6 to 8 people....Enjoy!

Monday, February 27, 2012

Brown Sugar Meatloaf




Hey Folks, Ground beef is easy on the budget, but it can be hard to come up with new ways to cook it. Here is one of a few recipes that can help!

INGREDIENTS:
1/2 cup packed brown sugar

1/2 cup ketchup

1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef

3/4 cup milk

2 eggs

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 small onion, chopped

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

3/4 cup finely crushed saltine cracker crumbs




DIRECTIONS:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease a 5x9 inch loaf pan
.
2. Press the brown sugar in the bottom of the prepared loaf pan and spread the ketchup over the sugar.

3. In a mixing bowl, mix thoroughly all remaining ingredients and shape into a loaf. Place on top of the
ketchup.

4. Bake in preheated oven for 1 hour or until juices are clear.

Serve with Mashed Potates and Gravy!


Enjoy!

Sunday, February 26, 2012

Asian Beef Skewers


Here is an Oscar party night treat that you could make hours before your friends come over to watch the Oscars.  My friends come over to watch the NBA All star game and we eat Fried Chicken and drink brew...But say you have a different set of friends coming over to watch the Oscars?  Just say? Well here is something you could make for those friends.

INGREDIENTS:

3 tablespoons hoisin sauce

3 tablespoons sherry

1/4 cup soy sauce

1 teaspoon barbeque sauce

2 green onions, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger root

1 1/2 pounds flank steak
skewers

DIRECTIONS:

In a small bowl, mix together hoisin sauce, sherry, soy sauce, barbeque sauce, green onions, garlic, and ginger.

2. Cut flank steak across grain on a diagonal into 1/4 inch slices. Place slices in a 1 gallon resealable plastic bag. Pour hoisin sauce mixture over slices, and mix well. Refrigerate 2 hours, or overnight.

3. Preheat an outdoor grill for high heat. Discard marinade, and thread steak on skewers.

4. Oil the grill grate. Grill skewers 3 minutes per side, or to desired doneness.

Footnotes:

Hoisin Sauce-also called Peking sauce, is a thick, reddish-brown sauce that is sweet and spicy, and widely used in Chinese cooking. It's a mixture of soybeans, garlic, chile peppers and various spices. It can be found in Asian markets and many large supermarkets. Look in the Asian or ethnic section. If this item is not in stock at your local store, ask your grocer to special order it for you. Most grocers will be happy to do this for their customers.

Enjoy!

Monday, February 20, 2012

Suasage & Shrimp Jambalaya


MMMMM.....I may be visiting New Orleans in  another year and just thinking about going there brings me visions of chowing down on some great jambalaya with sausage and shrimps. In my other blog, Escapades...My  fictional charactor, the soon to be married, Mabel Jenkins would've fixed a hot steaming plate of this for her former lover, Clerow or her current lover, Kerry "88" Moore. (If you don't follow the serialized fiction featured on my other blog, I realize you have no clue as to what or who I'm talking about...I just like to give shameless plugs for my other blogs every now and then...Indulge me!)

Getting back to food though...This is how Mabel would have prepared this.-

INGREDIENTS:

This jambalaya recipe is an easy, delicious version of one of America's great dishes. Jambalaya is soul food at its finest - hearty, satisfying, and deeply comforting. There are many variations of this Creole classic, but this sausage and shrimp version is my favorite jambalaya recipe.

The brown rice adds a great texture and nutty flavor, as well as raising the nutritional level of the dish.

Makes 4 Portions of Sausage and Shrimp Jambalaya
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 50 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour, 5 minutes

•2 tbsp butter

•8 oz Andouille sausage, or other spicy smoked sausage, sliced 1/4" thick

•2 tbsp paprika

•1 tbsp ground cumin

•1/2 tsp cayenne pepper

•1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper

•1 tsp salt

•1/2 cup diced tomato, fresh or canned

•1 large green bell pepper, diced

•2 ribs celery, sliced 1/4" thick

•4 green onions, sliced thin

•1 cup brown rice

DIRECTIONS:

In a heavy bottomed pot with a lid, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the sliced sausage and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes. Add the paprika, cumin, cayenne, black pepper, and salt. Saute the spices for 1 minute, and then add the tomatoes. Cook stirring for a few minutes to let some of the liquid from the tomatoes evaporate. Add the green bell pepper, celery, and most of the green onions (reserve some of the dark green slices of the onions to garnish the top); cook, stirring for 5 minutes.

Stir in the rice and mix well. Add the stock, turn the heat up to high, and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pot, and cook for 45 minutes. Remove the lid and check the rice. It should be just tender; if it is still too firm cook longer. When the rice is tender, add the shrimp, stir in, and cook covered for 5 minutes. Taste for seasoning, and adjust if needed. Serve the jambalaya in bowls with green onions sprinkled on top.

Note: if you decide to substitute white rice in this jambalaya recipe, you will need to check the recipe after 20 minutes, as it cooks much faster than brown rice.
ENJOY!

Saturday, February 18, 2012

Chicken Pasta Salad



Why Am I thinking about this now?   Is it because I just drove by an Olive garden only a while ago?  I don't know.  This is also a summer salad and no matter how fast I want the summer to get here...It's February and still in the middle of winter.

Still I can't get this off of my mind right now.....Somebody have a dinner party....Just kidding..but think about having this-

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 (16 ounce) package bow tie or corkscrew pasta, cooked
  • 3 cups cubed cooked chicken
  • 2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup Caesar or Parmesan salad dressing
  • 1 tablespoon honey mustard or other prepared mustard
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 large tomato, chopped
  • 1 cup shredded carrot

DIRECTIONS:

    1.In a large bowl, toss pasta, chicken, oil and garlic powder. Cover and chill. In a small bowl, combine mayonnaise, salad dressing, mustard, curry powder, salt and pepper; cover and chill. Just before serving, add the red pepper, tomato, carrot and dressing to pasta mixture; gently toss.

    See simple.....Serve this with a white wine.


    Enjoy!

    Friday, February 17, 2012

    Wholesome Buckwheat Crepes



    Anybody who knows me knows that I have a sweet tooth and that I like anything involving pancakes or pancake batter...So nothing is better than some crepes...Buckwheat Crepes....To start your weekend brunch.

    INGREDIENTS:


    2/3 cup raw buckwheat groats

    water, to cover

    1 egg

    2 tablespoons brown sugar

    1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/2 cup water, or as needed

    DIRECTIONS:


    These are very simple directions-.Combine buckwheat groats with about 1 1/3 cup water in a bowl; allow to soak, draining and rinsing once or twice during soaking, 4 hours to overnight.

    2.Rinse and drain groats one final time. Transfer drained groats to a blender with egg, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, and 1/2 cup water; blend into a smooth batter. Blend more water into the mixture as needed to reach a smooth, spreadable texture.

    3.Lightly grease a skillet and place over medium heat.

    4.Pour about 1/3 cup batter into the skillet; lift and tilt the skillet to swirl the batter evenly over the skillet; return to heat.

    5.Cook for about 2 minutes. Gently flip the crepe and cook the other side until the crepe is firm in the middle, about 2 minutes more; flip again and cook about 12 seconds. Plate and serve immediately.

    Look, I admit , I don't know where to tell you to buy any groats....So I'll give you an alternative...You can make a crepe with light pancake batter and  the other ingredients, sugar, cinnamon, salt...et al...and you can fill your crepe with fruit  mixes, such as cherries or berries..and it will taste just as well....but I guaruntee you, you'll thoroughly enjoy these crepes if you are industrious enough to find all of the ingredients needed to make them...(ie- groats.)

    Enjoy!

    Monday, February 13, 2012

    Warm Chocolate Cake with Mascarpone Cream



    It's been a week since I've posted here I know...but I was looking for something really good to share with you.  I believe that I have found it.  You know me...I'm always down for a good dessert...being the guy with the eternal sweet-tooth that I am... Here is a sweet treat that you are sure to like-

    INGREDIENTS:


    8 ounce(s) bittersweet chocolate, plus shavings for garnish, chopped

    1 1/2 stick(s) unsalted butter

    3 large eggs

    3 large large egg yolks, at room temperature

    1/2 cup(s) sugar

    1/4 cup(s) cake flour

    1/2 cup(s) heavy cream

    1/2 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped

    2 tablespoon(s) light brown sugar

    1/2 teaspoon(s) finely grated lemon zest

    1 cup(s) mascarpone

    1 teaspoon(s) fresh lemon juice

    1/2 cup(s) brandied cherries or kirsch-soaked sour cherries


    DIRECTIONS:

    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Coat six 6-ounce ramekins with butter, and dust lightly with flour. Set the ramekins on a sturdy baking sheet. In a microwave-safe bowl, melt the chocolate with the butter; let cool.

    In the bowl of a standing electric mixer fitted with the whisk, beat the eggs, yolks, and sugar on high speed until pale and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, gently fold in the chocolate, then fold in the cake flour just until no streaks remain.

    Spoon the batter into the prepared ramekins and bake for 15 minutes, until the cakes have risen, the tops are dry and the centers are slightly jiggly. Let stand for 5 minutes.

    In a bowl, beat the cream with the vanilla seeds, brown sugar, and lemon zest until soft peaks form. Add the mascarpone and lemon juice and beat until blended.

    Run the tip of a small knife around each cake to loosen it, then un mold onto plates. Spoon the mascarpone cream onto the cakes and garnish with the brandied cherries and chocolate shavings.

    You gotta have a tall glass of milk with this-






    Enjoy!

    Friday, February 3, 2012

    Brandon Albert's Hot Wings...



    It's Friday...Two days before the superbowl and what are most of us guys going to be eating?   That's a no brainer....Hot wings... Here is a recipe from someone who probably aspires to be in the Super Bowl, but just like me and my Eagles...He'll be somewhere with some friends watching it.  Brandon Albert, Tackle for the Kansas City Chiefs contributed this recipe. 



    I thought I would share it...It's very simple..


    INGREDIENTS:

    3 pounds chicken wings of course

    2 tablespoons butter

    1 (12-ounce) jar hot sauce or hot pepper sauce

    Blue cheese dressing for dipping


    DIRECTIONS:

    1. Put wings, butter, and hot sauce in a slow cooker set on medium and cook 3 hours.

    2. When finished cooking, set slow cooker to warm and serve (out of the pot) with blue cheese dressing for dipping.




    Of course for you real sports fans out there, mail or female...I don't have to tell you that you have Hot wings with Beer...Chicken and Brew...Perfect sports watching mix...Maybe a few chips too. Enjoy!

    Wednesday, February 1, 2012

    Live Forever


    Do you want to live at least until you are 90?  I know I do....Here are some healthy habits you need to have if you intend to do such...




    One of the biggest factors that determines how well you age is not your genes but how well you live. Not convinced? A study published in 2009 in the British Medical Journal of 20,000 British folks shows that you can cut your risk of having a stroke in half by doing the following four things: being active for 30 minutes a day, eating five daily servings of fruit and vegetables, and avoiding cigarettes and excess alcohol.

    While those are some of the obvious steps you can take to age well, researchers have discovered that centenarians tend to share certain traits in how they eat, move about, and deal with stress—the sorts of things we can emulate to improve our own aging process. Of course, getting to age 100 is enormously more likely if your parents did. (Recent research suggests that centenarians are 20 times as likely as the average person to have at least one long-lived relative.) Still, Thomas Perls, who studies the century-plus set at Boston University School of Medicine, believes that assuming you've sidestepped genes for truly fatal diseases like Huntington's, "there's nothing stopping you from living independently well into your 90s." Heck, if your parents and grandparents were heavy smokers, they might have died prematurely without ever reaching their true potential lifespan, so go ahead and shoot for those triple digits. Follow these 12 habits and check out Perls' lifetime risk calculator to see how long you can expect to live.

    1. Don't retire.

    "Evidence shows that in societies where people stop working abruptly, the incidence of obesity and chronic disease skyrockets after retirement," says Luigi Ferrucci, director of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. The Chianti region of Italy, which has a high percentage of centenarians, has a different take on leisure time. "After people retire from their jobs, they spend most of the day working on their little farm, cultivating grapes or vegetables," he says. "They're never really inactive." Farming isn't for you? Volunteer as a docent at your local art museum or join the Experience Corps, a program offered in 19 cities that places senior volunteers in urban public elementary schools for about 15 hours a week.

    2. Floss every day.

    That may help keep your arteries healthy. A 2008 New York University study showed that daily flossing reduced the amount of gum-disease-causing bacteria in the mouth. This bacteria is thought to enter the bloodstream and trigger inflammation in the arteries, a major risk factor for heart disease. Other research has shown that those who have high amounts of bacteria in their mouth are more likely to have thickening in their arteries, another sign of heart disease. "I really do think people should floss twice a day to get the biggest life expectancy benefits," says Perls.

    3. Move around.


    "Exercise is the only real fountain of youth that exists," says Jay Olshansky, a professor of medicine and aging researcher at the University of Illinois at Chicago. "It's like the oil and lube job for your car. You don't have to do it, but your car will definitely run better." Study after study has documented the benefits of exercise to improve your mood, mental acuity, balance, muscle mass, and bones. "And the benefits kick in immediately after your first workout," Olshansky adds. Don't worry if you're not a gym rat. Those who see the biggest payoffs are the ones who go from doing nothing to simply walking around the neighborhood or local mall for about 30 minutes a day. Building muscle with resistance training is also ideal, but yoga classes can give you similar strength-training effects if you're not into weight lifting.

    4. Eat a fiber-rich cereal for breakfast.


    Getting a serving of whole-grains, especially in the morning, appears to help older folks maintain stable blood sugar levels throughout the day, according to a recent study conducted by Ferrucci and his colleagues. "Those who do this have a lower incidence of diabetes, a known accelerator of aging," he says.


    5. Get at least six hours of shut-eye.

    Instead of skimping on sleep to add more hours to your day, get more to add years to your life. "Sleep is one of the most important functions that our body uses to regulate and heal cells," says Ferrucci. "We've calculated that the minimum amount of sleep that older people need to get those healing REM phases is about six hours." Those who reach the century mark make sleep a top priority.


    6. Consume whole foods, not supplements.


    Strong evidence suggests that people who have high blood levels of certain nutrients—selenium, beta-carotene, vitamins C and E—age much better and have a slower rate of cognitive decline. Unfortunately, there's no evidence that taking pills with these nutrients provides those antiaging benefits. "There are more than 200 different carotenoids and 200 different flavonoids in a single tomato," points out Ferrucci, "and these chemicals can all have complex interactions that foster health beyond the single nutrients we know about like lycopene or vitamin C." Avoid nutrient-lacking white foods (breads, flour, sugar) and go for all those colorful fruits and vegetables and dark whole-grain breads and cereals with their host of hidden nutrients.

    Whole Foods Diet Cookbook: How to Eat for Health and Taste

    7. Be less neurotic.

    It may work for Woody Allen, who infuses his worries with a healthy dose of humor, but the rest of us neurotics may want to find a new way to deal with stress. "We have a new study coming out that shows that centenarians tend not to internalize things or dwell on their troubles," says Perls. "They are great at rolling with the punches." If this inborn trait is hard to overcome, find better ways to manage when you're stressed: Yoga, exercise, meditation, tai chi, or just deep breathing for a few moments are all good. Ruminating, eating chips in front of the TV, binge drinking? Bad, very bad.

    8. Live like a Seventh Day Adventist.

    Americans who define themselves as Seventh Day Adventists have an average life expectancy of 89, about a decade longer than the average American. One of the basic tenets of the religion is that it's important to cherish the body that's on loan from God, which means no smoking, alcohol abuse, or overindulging in sweets. Followers typically stick to a vegetarian diet based on fruits, vegetables, beans, and nuts, and get plenty of exercise. They're also very focused on family and community.


    9. Be a creature of habit.

    Centenarians tend to live by strict routines, says Olshansky, eating the same kind of diet and doing the same kinds of activities their whole lives. Going to bed and waking up at the same time each day is another good habit to keep your body in the steady equilibrium that can be easily disrupted as you get on in years. "Your physiology becomes frailer when you get older," explains Ferrucci, "and it's harder for your body to bounce back if you, say, miss a few hours of sleep one night or drink too much alcohol." This can weaken immune defenses, leaving you more susceptible to circulating flu viruses or bacterial infections.

    10. Stay connected.

    Having regular social contacts with friends and loved ones is key to avoiding depression, which can lead to premature death, something that's particularly prevalent in elderly widows and widowers. Some psychologists even think that one of the biggest benefits elderly folks get from exercise the strong social interactions that come from walking with a buddy or taking a group exercise class. Having a daily connection with a close friend or family member gives older folks the added benefit of having someone watch their back. "They'll tell you if they think your memory is going or if you seem more withdrawn," says Perls, "and they might push you to see a doctor before you recognize that you need to see one yourself."

    11. Be conscientious.


    The strongest personality predictor of a long life is conscientiousness—that is, being prudent, persistent, and well organized, according to The Longevity Project, coauthored by Howard Friedman and Leslie Martin. The book describes a study that followed 1,500 children for eight decades, collecting exhaustive details about their personal histories, health, activities, beliefs, attitudes, and families. The children who were prudent and dependable lived the longest, Friedman says, likely because conscientious types are more inclined to follow doctors' orders, take the right medicines at the right doses, and undergo routine checkups. They're also likelier to report happier marriages and more satisfying work lives than their less conscientious peers.

    12. More SEX!!



    Enough said!


    Food Safety Tips
    Protect yourself against food-borne illnesses.


    1. Use a "refrigerator thermometer" to keep your food stored at a safe temperature (below 40 degrees fahrenheit).

    Cold temperatures slow the growth of bacteria. Ensuring that your refrigerator temperature stays at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or colder is one of the most effective ways to reduce your risk of food-borne illness. You can buy a refrigerator/freezer thermometer at appliance stories, home centers (i.e. Home Depot), and kitchen stores including online ones, such as Cooking.com.

    2. Defrost food in the refrigerator, the microwave, or in cold water... never on the counter!

    Perishable foods should never be thawed on the counter for longer than two hours because, while the center of the food may remain frozen, the outer surface may enter the Danger Zone, the range of temperatures between 40 and 140 degrees fahrenheit, in which bacteria multiply rapidly. If you’re short on time, use the microwave or you can thaw meat and poultry in airtight packaging in cold water. Change the water every half-hour so it stays cold and use the thawed food immediately.

    3. Always use separate cutting boards for raw meat/poultry/fish and cooked foods/fresh produce.

    Bacteria from uncooked meat, poultry, and fish can contaminate cooked foods and fresh produce. An important way to reduce this risk is to use separate cutting boards for raw meat/poultry/ fish, and cooked foods/fresh produce.

    4. Always cook meat to proper temperatures, using a calibrated instant-read thermometer to make sure.

    One effective way to prevent illness is to use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of meat, poultry, and egg dishes. The USDA Recommended Safe Minimum Internal Temperatures are as follows:

    * Beef, veal, and lamb (steaks and roasts), fish - 145 degrees fahrenheit

    * Pork and ground beef - 160 degrees fahrenheit

    * Poultry - 165 degrees fahrenheit.

    Cook meats like roasts and steaks to lower temperatures, closer to medium-rare, so that they retain their moisture. It is recommended that those who are at high risk for developing food-borne illness (i.e. pregnant women and their unborn babies, newborns, young children, older adults, people with weakened immune systems, or certain chronic illnesses) should follow the USDA guidelines.

    5. Avoid unpasteurized/raw milk and cheeses made from unpasteurized milk that are aged less than 60 days.

    Raw milk is milk from cows, sheep, or goats that has not been pasteurized (heated to a very high temperature for a specific length of time) to kill harmful bacteria that may be present. These bacteria, which include salmonella, E. coli and listeria, can cause serious illness and sometimes even death. The bacteria in raw milk can be especially dangerous to pregnant women, children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems or chronic illnesses. Raw milk cheeses aged 60 days or longer are okay, since the salt and acidity of the cheese-making process make for a hostile environment to pathogens.

    6. Never eat "runny" eggs or foods, such as cookie dough, that contain raw eggs.

    Even eggs that have clean, intact shells may be contaminated with salmonella, so it’s important to cook eggs thoroughly until both the yolk and the white are firm. Casseroles and other dishes containing eggs should be cooked to 160 degrees fahrenheit and you can use an instant-read food thermometer to check. Eggs should always be cooked fully and those who are at high risk for developing foodborne illness (pregnant women and their unborn babies, newborns, young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune systems or certain chronic illnesses should follow the USDA guidelines. If you can’t resist runny eggs or sampling cookie batter, use pasteurized eggs. They’re found near other eggs in large supermarkets.

    7. Always wash your hands in warm soapy water for at least 20 seconds before handling food and after touching raw meat, poultry, or eggs.

    You can pick up a lot of bacteria out in the world, so it’s important to always wash your hands before you eat or prepare food. You should also wash your hands after touching any uncooked meat, poultry, fish, or eggs, as the bacteria from these foods can contaminate cooked foods and fresh produce. Use soap and warm water and wash thoroughly for at least 20 seconds.

    8. Always heat leftover foods to 165 degrees fahrenheit.

    The USDA recommends heating all cooked leftovers to 165 degrees fahrenheit in order to kill all potentially dangerous bacteria.

    9. Never eat meat, poultry, eggs, or sliced fresh fruits and vegetables that have been left out for more than two hours or more than one hour in temperatures hotter than 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

    If you leave perishable foods out of the refrigerator or freezer for more than two hours they may enter the Danger Zone—the unsafe temperatures between 40 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, in which bacteria multiply rapidly.

    10. Whenever there’s a food recall, check products stored at home to make sure they are safe.

    You should discard any food that’s been recalled because it’s associated with the outbreak of a food-borne illness. But, according to a survey conducted by Rutgers University during the fall of 2008, only about 60% of Americans search their homes for foods that have been recalled because of contamination. For more information on food recalls, visit the website Recalls.gov






    Cavier & Vodka
    Courtesy of The Lady (Bug) of the Household